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Big Bite August Newsletter

The Suicide Buzzbait new for 2018.
Big Bite Baits Fishing Lures pro Michael Neal targets Bream beds during the dog days of Summer looking for opportunistic Largemouth. Our new Big Bite Baits Fishing Lures Suicide Buzzbaitis a great option for covering water in search of those Largemouth taking advantage of the Bream spawn. “The new Suicide Buzzbait will definitely be one of the baits I have tied on all Summer long. I can cover a lot of shallow water with it in a hurry, and it does a great job at imitating a fleeing Bream.” said Neal
Big Bite Pro Russ Lane doesn’t like to leave anything on the table when it comes to Summer time ledge fishing. The Alabama pro urges you to make sure you play clean up before leaving that sweet spot that seems to have played out. “Often times I see anglers leave a spot too soon once an active bite has begun to taper off,” says Lane. “When I find an active school of fish on a ledge, and they stop biting moving baits like a crankbait or swimbait, I am always going to follow up with what I like to call a clean up bait.” Lane’s clean up bait of choice during the Summer is a 10″ Big Bite Baits Kriet Tail worm, fished on a 1/2 oz or heavier stand up style jig head. Lane fishes this bait on a 7’2″ Heavy Denali Kovert Lite Worm & Jig rod (K864WJ), paired with a 6:3:1 gear ratio reel spooled with 16 lb Sunline FC Sniper. “Playing clean up on a spot will often times allow you to catch several more fish, and sometimes they can be the largest fish in the school.” Lane concluded.
Our Big Bite Baits Fishing Lures 4″ Shrimp Tail in Pearl/Chartreuse Tail and New Penny are hot colors right now for Summertime inshore saltwater fishing!
Got Questions? Call the Coach
Do you have product or rigging questions about our baits?  Call the “the Coach”, Les Bratcher at 877-222-7429 on Monday, Tuesdays or Thursdays from 8am-4pm cst.
Big Bite Baits | 877-222-7429 | contact@bigbitebaits.com | www.bigbitebaits.com
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Big Bite ICAST Sneak Peek

BIG BITE 2018 ICAST SNEAK PEAK
Here is your sneak peak of what Big Bite is introducing at this years ICAST.  
Big Bites B5 Swimbait – The B5 has a line pass straw and weight molded right into the bait all you do is tie on the provided treble hook and you are ready to fish. Comes in 7 custom colors and clear so you can create your own color combinations.

Big Bite Tour Toad – If you are looking for topwater action the new Tour Toad is for you. The Tour Toad gets on the surface with a few turns of your reel handle. It is 4″ in length and made to be able to be cast on a baitcaster, it also has a hook slot molded into the back so you can fish in the heaviest of cover.

Big Bite Suicide Buzz – We took our top selling swimbait and rigged it on a buzz bait body to give you the Suicide Buzz. The Suicide Buzz creates the ultimate baitfish profile on the surface when fished. It will come in 2 sizes 1/4oz and 3/8oz and is available in 4 colors.

Big Bite Swimbait Head noted most of the swimbait jig head that are on the market do not offer a hook long enough to rig larger swimbaits on.  Our new Swimbait Jig Head is made with an oversized black nickel hook in each size to allow them to be used with heavy line and bigger baits.  The Swimbait Jig Head comes in 1/8oz, 1/4oz, 3/8oz, 1/2oz, 3/4oz and 1oz sizes.

Big Bite Screw In Neko Rig Weights. Neko rig fishing is fast turning into a top finesse presentation but one of the problems is the fish are able to throw the push in nail weights out of your bait. Leave it to Big Bite to turn towards a nail weight that screws in and stays in. The Neko Rig Weight will come in 1/32oz, 1/16oz,1/8oz in 10 count packs.

Big Bite Tour Flipper Tube is 4″ long and made with a hard head for easy rigging. It is the softest tube Big Bite has ever made and is made with 3x more large grain salt getting the bass to hold on longer to improve your hooking percentages. The Tour Flipper Tube comes in 10 of Big Bites top bass catching colors.

Big Bite Tour Toad Buzz has combined the new Tour Toad and a Big Bites buzz head to give you the Tour Toad Buzz. The Tour Toad Buzz will be offered in 2 sizes 1/4oz and 3/8oz and will be available in 4 different color combinations.
Got Questions? Call the Coach
Do you have product or rigging questions about our baits?  Call the “the Coach”, Les Bratcher at 877-222-7429 on Monday, Tuesdays or Thursdays from 8am-4pm cst.
Big Bite Baits | 877-222-7429 | contact@bigbitebaits.com | www.bigbitebaits.com
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BIG BITE MAY NEWS LETTER

 

PRESS RELEASE
May 29, 2015

For Immediate
ReleaseContact:
Scott Petersen
Big Bite Baits

BIG BITE MAY NEWS LETTER

Tips For Tricks

By: Scott M. Petersen

Just like the tradition of bass hitting the shallows every year in the spring to hunt for food and spawn we are bringing you the next Big Bite News Letter that talks about Trick Sticks. There is something about spring, shallow bass, and Trick Sticks they just seem to go together. We have included some new rigs and tactics for this edition of the News Letter so sit back and take in this month’s Tips For Tricks.

Texas Rigged – No Weight

Here is how it all started, Trick Sticks rigged with no weight. There is something about a slow falling Trick Stick that no bass can seem to resist, rigged weightless the Trick Stick has a slow shimmy action to its fall. Match your hook size to the Trick Stick you are using and you will be all set. I generally match up a 5″ Trick Stick with a 4/0 EWG Gamakatsu worm hook, and if I go to a 4″ Trick I downsize to a 3/0 EWG Gamakatsu hook, if I up size to a 6″ Trick I upsize my hook as well to a 5/0 EWG Gamakatsu.

I generally let the conditions help me choose my equipment for fishing an un-weighted Trick. If I am fishing the 4″ and 5″ Tricks I many times will opt for a spinning setup, 7′ medium action rod with a matching spinning reel, spooled with either 8lb to 10lb Sunline Sniper line. If I am fishing in cover I will opt to go to Sunline SX1 20lb braided line as my line choice. When fishing around heavy cover that the bass can get me down into and break me off I will opt to change to a baitcaster setup and beef up my line size. I will use a 7ft medium action rod that is teamed with a baitcaster reel that is spooled with either 12lb to 16lb Sunline Sniper or 30lb SX1 braided line depending on conditions that I am fishing this is also the setup that I fish my 6″ Trick Sticks on.

Texas Rigged – Weighted

Weighting the Trick Stick will make it do different things as it falls, a lot of this action will depends where you place the weight. If you use a bullet worm weight in the front of the Trick Stick the Trick Stick will fall nose first into the cover you are fishing. You could say it has a nose down fall/swimming action. I use this rigging if the bass are active. If you use a weighted hook with the weight in the middle when the Trick Stick falls, it falls more in a horizontal straight position. I have found that this is one of the best ways to rig the Trick Stick if the bass are shut off or in a neutral mood. This bait coming down towards the bottom in a hover mode is sometimes more than they can resist.

One of the newest ways to fish a Trick Stick has come forward in the last few years is to tail weight the Trick Stick. This will make the Trick Stick fall backwards on a slack line. This rigging and tactic excels when fishing around docks and laydowns. When you pull the bait forward then give the bait slack by lowering the rod tip the Trick Stick will fall backwards. This tactic works great when working around cover or docks where you can lead the bait to an opening then drop it back into an area that may be holding bass.

When it comes to rigging the tail weighted Trick Stick you can do this in a few different ways, one of the easiest ways is to use either sheet metal or wood screws. This rigging will allow you to adjust the weight by changing the screw size. Another way is to use a screw lock weight. Take a weight that has a screw lock and screw it into the tail of the Trick Stick. The last way is to use lead nails. You can get these and cut them to the weight that is needed or you can use copper wire as a backup plan if needed. When it comes to equipment I pretty much follow what was said above.

Jig Head Trick Stick

When faced with bass in an inactive mood one of the baits that I always turn towards is a Trick Stick that is rigged on a weedless jig head. When the bass are active they will sit on the tops of the weeds chasing food, but when they get inactive they will have a tendency to sit at the bottom of the weedline many times facing out looking for something easy to eat coming by, a Trick Stick on a weedless jig head fills this bill perfect. I have rigged the Trick Stick on, both weedless and exposed hook jig heads; I let the conditions dictate this choice.

When it comes to equipment for me it is a spinning setup all the way. I use a 7ft medium action spinning setup teamed with a matching spinning reel that is spooled with 8lb to 10lb Sunline Sniper line, or I will go up to 20lb Sunline SX1 braid if conditions call for it.

Tail Spin Sticks

Over the years there have been a few different ways of how to rig and fish the Trick Stick that came from fishermen that had an idea; this is an example of one of these ideas. Looking at this rigging you will say to yourself “why didn’t I come up with this idea myself”. To make this rigging you will need a few different parts. To start take a 5″or 6″ Trick Stick and Texas rig it onto your hook. Next you will need Hitchhicker and a swivel with either a snap or a split ring and your choice of spinner blade.

Thread your Hitchhiker into the tail of your Trick Stick with the swivel rigged onto the Hitchhicker. Next you need to put some thought into the blade you choose. If you are just looking at add some flash to your offering you will want to pick a willow leaf blade. If you are looking to slow the fall down and add a little sound attraction you will want a Colorado blade option. If you are looking to fall in between then choose an Indiana blade option.

Fishing options, you can fish your Trick in a slow swimming action where you slowly reel your Trick Stick back in, or use a tradition lift and drop like you were fishing a Texas rigged Trick. Equipment wise I fish this offering more on a 7ft medium action baitcaster, teamed with a baitcasting reel spooled with 12lb to 16lb Sunline Sniper line.

Wacky Rigged Tricks

One of the most popular ways to fish the Trick Stick the last few years has been to rig it wacky style in fact to help you with this rigging Big Bite has made a Wacky Rig Trick Stick that has an o-ring molded right into the Trick Stick for you to run your hook through. However you rig it fishing a Trick Stick wacky style should be in your arsenal of plans when you hit the water anytime. One of the biggest changes in this category has been the different jig heads that have hit the market now. Please take a closer look at what’s available to enhance your wacky rigging.

I fish my Wacky Rigs on a spinning setup 7′ medium, teamed with a matching spinning reel that is spooled with 8lb to 10lb Sunline Sniper line. If fishing in and around cover I opt to use a 7ft medium action baitcaster setup teamed with a baitcaster reel that is spooled with 12lb Sunline Sniper line.

So as we wrap up another issue of the Big Bite News Letter on Trick Sticks, I hope we have brought you some info that you have not either used or even thought of before. Once again as we have said Trick Sticks can be used all season long, but work best during the early part of the season. If you have some Trick Stick riggings and tactics that you would like to share with all the Big Bite fans please log onto the Big Bite Facebook page and share these tactics. To see all the Big Bite Trick Stick options and top fish catching Big Bite colors please log onto www.bigbitebaits.com

BIG BITE PRO UPDATE

Photo Courtesy of BASS

Rojas Leads Elites AOY Heading Into 2nd Half 

Big Bite Pro Dean Rojas leads the Elite tour Angler Of The Year points race heading into the second half of the season. Dean has had 3 Top 12 finishes and has finished no lower than 19th this season so far. Much of Deans success has come on 2 of his Big Bite Signature Baits the Warmouth in Shall Cracker and War Party colors and the Rojas Fighting Frog in Tilapia, Vegas Flash and Can’t Resist It colors. Dean has a 10 point lead heading into BASSfest on Kentucky Lake over Justin Lucas.
Best of luck Dean!!!
http://shop.bigbitebaits.com/Creature-Bait-6_c90.hmt

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BIG BITE APRIL NEWS LETTER

 

PRESS RELEASE
April 30, 2015

For Immediate
ReleaseContact:
Scott Petersen
Big Bite Baits

BIG BITE APRIL NEWS LETTER

Photo Courtesy Of BASS

Spring Time Big Bite Bass Tactics

By: Scott M. Petersen

When the bass start to hit the beds in your favorite lake or river what Big Bite Bait do you reach for? If you took a poll I bet the answers would be across the board, but tearing it down there are a few that come to mind that would rise to the top of the list, WarMouth, Tube Bait and a Drop Shot. Let’s look at these three baits and the tactics behind fishing them for early season spring time bass.

WarMouth

If I was a betting man my money would be on Big Bite Pro Dean Rojas that when faced with sight fishing bedding bass this is the bait that Rojas will have tied onto the end of his line. He has proven it time and time again that the WarMouth is his sight fishing go to bait of choice. In fact if I remember right he has cashed a few checks using the WarMouth in a few situations when fishing the Elites in just the last few years.

There is a connection between the bass and bluegills that makes this combination work so well. Bluegill are an enemy to the bass especially when the bass roam off of their nests. Bluegill many times will rush in and start to eat the bass eggs or new fry so bass will work to keep the bluegill away from the beds once the new eggs are laid or hatched. If fact if you get a chance to see bluegill raiding an abandon bass nest they will turn on their side and flap their tail to get the eggs to come up with the silt from the bed then they turn around and start to eat the suspended eggs with a few passes. So it is not uncommon to see bass go after gills that get close to the nest.

Looking at how Dean rigs the WarMouth, you have a perfect imitation of what a bluegill looks like on its side heading into a nest to go on a raid. Dean rigs his WarMouth on a Gamakatsu 3/0 EWG worm hook and teams this with a weight to match the conditions that Dean is fishing, he rigs his WarMouth on its side to imitate a gill on its side raiding a bed when pitched close to or into a bed. Intentions are the bass will strike this bait for any reason once it sees the bait, I have seen bass come after this bait when it is not even close to the bed just to strike the bait out of spite thinking it is killing a bluegill that could cause harm to its nest.

Cast or pitch the WarMouth, you can pitch the WarMouth if you see a bed or you can blind cast the WarMouth to cover water if you do not see a bass bed, whatever way you want to fish it the WarMouth is a bait to have tied on when the bass start to hit the shallows for the spawning season.

Tubes

Know as one of the first true bait to fish when the bass started to spawn, the tube for many years was just that, only fished when the bass started to hit the beds. The tube has a unique fall that would circle its way down to the bass causing strikes from bass sitting on beds above them as the bait started to fall. If you underweight the tube it would stay in the strike zone longer and if you needed a faster fall you could up size the weight of the jig you were using to get a straight fall from the bait, however you choose to fish it, the tube can flat out catch spawning bass. For a long time bass fishermen would throw a tube in the spawning season and put it away for the rest of the season, now bass fishermen have found that the tube is more than just a bait to use when bass hit the beds.

By changing the eye position of your jig you can made the tube do a few different things. When using a 90 degree eyed jig the tube will fall in a tight circle over a bass that is sitting on the bed, another tip go on the light side when picking a weight, the lighter the jig that you pick the slower the fall triggering more bites in your day of fishing. If I see bass on the beds this is my tube rigging of choice.

In between beds I will make a slight change I will use a 60 degree eye jig for a search bait. This rigging will have a larger circle fall and will cover more water when looking for beds or roaming bass. If I see a bass on a bed it is a quick switch to get to the other tube and back to work.

For the majority of the time I will fish tubes on a spinning setup, 7ft medium action rod teamed with a matching spinning reel that is spooled with 8lb to 10lb Sunline Sniper. If I am fishing around allot of cover I may opt to go to 12lb to 14lb Sunline SX1 braided line or I may grab a baitcaster that is spooled with 16lb Sunline Sniper line. I let the cover dictate the setup choice that I fish.

Drop Shot

Over the years drop shots have been mainly used for a deep water tactic, but in the last few years it has started to catch on when fishing for bass that are on the beds. That is for one simple reason, you can keep the bait in front of the bass for a great amount of time, and this will help you trigger strikes from the most finicky bass that you can encounter.

Rigging for this spawning drop shot is no different than the other except for the fact that you may want to up the poundage of the line you are using when fishing around cover other than that it is the same. For me I generally up my line size from 6lb to 10lb. I can get by with this line size the majority of the time, in the case I think I need more I may opt to use a7ft medium action rod teamed with a matching baitcaster reel that has 12lb to 14lb test line.

One change I do make is the hook that I use for this setup. I am a firm believer in using the Gamakatsu Swivel Shot G-Finesse Hook Drop Shot setup in deep water, but when fishing a drop shot in the spring I opt to use a Gamakatsu Finesse Heavy Cover hook. This way I can bury the hook into the offering that I am fishing making it more weedless when around cover.

When it comes to baits that I use I will have a few laid out on the deck of the boat, 4″ and 6″ Shaking Squirrel and the new 3.75″ jointed minnows are first to come to mind. If I am looking to fish my drop shot in a wacky presentation I will opt to use a 4″ Trick Stick.

So when you hit the water and see the bass starting to get onto the beds remember some of these tactics and go to work. The WarMouth, Tubes and Drop Shot will give you three of the best spawning presentations to work with this spring. Please try to remember that the bass are spawning and release them to make it back to the beds to carry on the tradition. If you have a special tactic that you would like to share with the rest of the Big Bite fans please log onto the Big Bite Facebook page and let the fans know. To check out all the baits that Big Bite has to offer please log onto www.bigbitebaits.com

BIG BITE PRO UPDATE

2nd Southern Open Alabama River

Storming into the 2nd stop of the season on the Alabama River Big Bite Pro Russ Lane and Michael Neal finished in the Top 10. Russ earned a 7th place finish and Michael Neal took 9th place. Congratulations.

WWW.BIGBITEBAITS.COM

 

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ICAST 2015 Newsletter

PRESS RELEASE
Nov 9, 2015

For Immediate
ReleaseContact:
Scott Petersen
Big Bite Baits

BIG BITE NEWSLETTER FALL 2015

With the Fall’s cooler temps starting to bring down water temps all over the country it is time to grab a flipping stick and go toe-to-toe with the bass in your local waters. In this month’s Big Bite newsletter, we are talking flipping and pitching tactics.

Toe To Toe Bassin
By: Scott M. Petersen
When leaves start to turn colors and make their way to the ground, the cool temps of Fall will start to bring your local water temps down causing the bass to start making movements from their deep water haunts that they have spent their summer in back into the shallows. With that change if you want to be part of the catching crew of bass fishermen you will have to make the move right along with them. It is the time of the year to put down your deep water jig or crankbait rod that you have been using all summer long and grab your flipping stick to get ready to go toe-to-toe with these newly located bass. Bass will leave the comfort of their summer haunts that they have stayed in for the last few months chasing baitfish and crawfish out on the rocks and move back to the areas where they started their spring season, in the weeds, buried in some brush cover, or ambushing baitfish from a laydown on the bank.
Part of this movement may be fueled by their food source making a big move back towards the shallows at this time of the season forcing the bass to follow. For whatever reason that may draw their food source towards the shallows without food the bass will not survive for long so they are forced to make the move also.
Bass heading back to the shallows will look for cover to ambush food from. Weeds, brush, laydowns, and docks will play a big part of where the bass will take up residence for the next few months.  Let’s take a look at some of the things that you can do to put more odds in your favor when it comes to Fall time toe-to-toe bassin.
Locations
Electronics will play a big part in how you will find the cover that the bass are holding in or on. If you are hunting down brush piles that are located off of the bank, Humminbird Side Imaging will be worth its weight in gold. Set your range at 150ft on each side of the boat and make a few passes over the flats looking for a starting spot. Once you find a few areas drop waypoints on these spots to come back to and fish.
Weed edges will play a big part in holding bass during this part of the season. Bass can burry up in the weeds during harsh cold front conditions and also position themselves on the inside or outside edges ambushing food when they are active. If it is a cool night, they have the warmth of the weeds to keep them warm at night noting they will feel right at home when buried up in the weeds.
Look at the condition of the weeds you are fishing if they look brown and dying keep moving, if the weeds are green and alive that is your key to start your hunt. One of the first things you have to find, look for pockets in the weeds to figure out the position of the bass. Are the bass buried up in the weeds or are they roaming the edge hunting for food?
One tip here use your Side Imaging to look for key changes in the weeds. Look for rocks that are located outside of the weedline, these will be key areas and will be prime for bass location. I also use Side Imaging to help mark inside and outside turns in the weedlines, when you find these areas drop a waypoint that you can come back to and fish. I also give weedline points the same treatment; if you see a weedline point along the edge drop a waypoint on it to come back to.
Laydowns on the bank are easy to see and should also get your attention. Take the time to work your way towards the laydown and work the outside first then work into the middle. Do not start your flips inside as you will spook the bass that may be holding on the outside edges of the brush or tree. Work the outside edge first then move to the sweet spot inside with your presentation.
One of the fall time locations that is kind of forgotten at this time of the season is docks. If you are in the south docks stay in all year long but up in the north, they start to get removed before the lakes ice up. As the shallow weeds start to die off docks will be an option for the bass to use as feeding stations. When on the water take the time to check a few docks especially the ones that are located close to deep water. These deep water areas will be easy to target as you can see them on your lake map chip.
Jig or Plastics
This is a question that every fishermen is faced with for me I use both options and let the bass tell me what they prefer that day. Bait options when it comes to Big Bite plastics are the Real Deal Craw, YoMama, 4″ Rojas Fighting Frog and new this year is the 5″ Rojas Fighting Frog. This is a prime bait of choice when you are looking for a bigger bite or if you need a bigger profile bait when fishing in dirty water conditions. Add to that the new Swimming Mama and Mike McClelland’s first signature bait the Battle Bug.
Any of these baits can be rigged and used as a jig trailer or used on a heavy cover hook teamed with an appropriate sized tungsten weight to fish the cover you are targeting.  If you are looking to use a bait that is a cross between a jig and plastics use a weight that allows you to add a skirt, this will give you the best of both worlds when needed.
One special note if you are looking for more of a flapping action or gliding action out of your plastics leave the pincher part of your Big Bite plastics together. If you are looking for more action out of your bait separate the pinchers of your plastics option.
Equipment
When it comes to equipment I beef up for my toe-to-toe battle. 8ft heavy action flipping stick, teamed with a 7:1 speed reel, that is spooled with 60lb Sunline FX2 braided line is my equipment of choice. I many times let the target that I am fishing dictate if I flip or make a pitching presentation. If the target is close and I need to make repeated dunks I will use flipping as my choice. It is easier to use a lift and drop presentation to hit more areas than making a pitch every time. If I am a distance away from the target I would like to hit, I will use a pitching presentation to get my bait into the target zone.
If you are fishing in clear water conditions and feel that the bass are line weary, spool up your flipping reel with Sunline Flipping FC in the 20-25lb range. This will allow you to make your presentation a little more undetected many times paying dividends by the end of your day of fishing.
Pay special attention and let the bass tell you how they want the bait fished. There will be days that when the bait hits the water they are on it. This may be days after a cold night followed by a bright sunny day, as the sun warms up the upper layer of the weeds the bass will move to the upper layer of the weeds to soak up the warmth of the sun in the morning. As the day goes on they may move back towards the bottom and take up a new ambush position.
If the bass are positioned on the bottom they may want the bait hoped a couple of times on the bottom to trigger the bite, when you get a bite make a mental note as to where the bite is coming from and how you are fishing the bait. Use this information to key in on and get more bites during your day of fishing. Let the bass tell you how they want the bait presented that day and the key to these holding locations.
So the next time you hit the water this Fall be ready to go toe-to-toe with the bass in your local waters. Be it a jig or just plastics rigged on a heavy cover hook Big Bite has a bait option for you. To see all the Big Bite Baits please log onto www.bigbitebaits.com.

BIG BITE PRO UPDATE

 

 

 

 

 

Photo’s Courtesy Of  BASS.

ROJAS AND LANE MAKE 2016 CLASSIC

Congratulations to Dean Rojas and Russ Lane for making it to the 2016 Bassmaster Classic that will be held on Oklahoma’s Grand Lake March 4-6, 2016. Dean and Russ earned points through the Elite tournaments last year earning spots in the Angler Of The Year race to qualify for the 2016 Classic.

NOVEMBER BIG BITE DEALS

http://shop.bigbitebaits.com/Cane-Thumper_c188.htm

http://shop.bigbitebaits.com/Big-Bite-Camo-Hoodie-CAMOHOOD.htm

http://shop.bigbitebaits.com/Big-Bite-Baits-Car-Tag-in-Black-CarTag-01.htm

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Fall 2015 Newsletter

PRESS RELEASE
Nov 9, 2015

For Immediate
ReleaseContact:
Scott Petersen
Big Bite Baits

BIG BITE NEWSLETTER FALL 2015

With the Fall’s cooler temps starting to bring down water temps all over the country it is time to grab a flipping stick and go toe-to-toe with the bass in your local waters. In this month’s Big Bite newsletter, we are talking flipping and pitching tactics.

Toe To Toe Bassin
By: Scott M. Petersen
When leaves start to turn colors and make their way to the ground, the cool temps of Fall will start to bring your local water temps down causing the bass to start making movements from their deep water haunts that they have spent their summer in back into the shallows. With that change if you want to be part of the catching crew of bass fishermen you will have to make the move right along with them. It is the time of the year to put down your deep water jig or crankbait rod that you have been using all summer long and grab your flipping stick to get ready to go toe-to-toe with these newly located bass. Bass will leave the comfort of their summer haunts that they have stayed in for the last few months chasing baitfish and crawfish out on the rocks and move back to the areas where they started their spring season, in the weeds, buried in some brush cover, or ambushing baitfish from a laydown on the bank.
Part of this movement may be fueled by their food source making a big move back towards the shallows at this time of the season forcing the bass to follow. For whatever reason that may draw their food source towards the shallows without food the bass will not survive for long so they are forced to make the move also.
Bass heading back to the shallows will look for cover to ambush food from. Weeds, brush, laydowns, and docks will play a big part of where the bass will take up residence for the next few months.  Let’s take a look at some of the things that you can do to put more odds in your favor when it comes to Fall time toe-to-toe bassin.
Locations
Electronics will play a big part in how you will find the cover that the bass are holding in or on. If you are hunting down brush piles that are located off of the bank, Humminbird Side Imaging will be worth its weight in gold. Set your range at 150ft on each side of the boat and make a few passes over the flats looking for a starting spot. Once you find a few areas drop waypoints on these spots to come back to and fish.
Weed edges will play a big part in holding bass during this part of the season. Bass can burry up in the weeds during harsh cold front conditions and also position themselves on the inside or outside edges ambushing food when they are active. If it is a cool night, they have the warmth of the weeds to keep them warm at night noting they will feel right at home when buried up in the weeds.
Look at the condition of the weeds you are fishing if they look brown and dying keep moving, if the weeds are green and alive that is your key to start your hunt. One of the first things you have to find, look for pockets in the weeds to figure out the position of the bass. Are the bass buried up in the weeds or are they roaming the edge hunting for food?
One tip here use your Side Imaging to look for key changes in the weeds. Look for rocks that are located outside of the weedline, these will be key areas and will be prime for bass location. I also use Side Imaging to help mark inside and outside turns in the weedlines, when you find these areas drop a waypoint that you can come back to and fish. I also give weedline points the same treatment; if you see a weedline point along the edge drop a waypoint on it to come back to.
Laydowns on the bank are easy to see and should also get your attention. Take the time to work your way towards the laydown and work the outside first then work into the middle. Do not start your flips inside as you will spook the bass that may be holding on the outside edges of the brush or tree. Work the outside edge first then move to the sweet spot inside with your presentation.
One of the fall time locations that is kind of forgotten at this time of the season is docks. If you are in the south docks stay in all year long but up in the north, they start to get removed before the lakes ice up. As the shallow weeds start to die off docks will be an option for the bass to use as feeding stations. When on the water take the time to check a few docks especially the ones that are located close to deep water. These deep water areas will be easy to target as you can see them on your lake map chip.
Jig or Plastics
This is a question that every fishermen is faced with for me I use both options and let the bass tell me what they prefer that day. Bait options when it comes to Big Bite plastics are the Real Deal Craw, YoMama, 4″ Rojas Fighting Frog and new this year is the 5″ Rojas Fighting Frog. This is a prime bait of choice when you are looking for a bigger bite or if you need a bigger profile bait when fishing in dirty water conditions. Add to that the new Swimming Mama and Mike McClelland’s first signature bait the Battle Bug.
Any of these baits can be rigged and used as a jig trailer or used on a heavy cover hook teamed with an appropriate sized tungsten weight to fish the cover you are targeting.  If you are looking to use a bait that is a cross between a jig and plastics use a weight that allows you to add a skirt, this will give you the best of both worlds when needed.
One special note if you are looking for more of a flapping action or gliding action out of your plastics leave the pincher part of your Big Bite plastics together. If you are looking for more action out of your bait separate the pinchers of your plastics option.
Equipment
When it comes to equipment I beef up for my toe-to-toe battle. 8ft heavy action flipping stick, teamed with a 7:1 speed reel, that is spooled with 60lb Sunline FX2 braided line is my equipment of choice. I many times let the target that I am fishing dictate if I flip or make a pitching presentation. If the target is close and I need to make repeated dunks I will use flipping as my choice. It is easier to use a lift and drop presentation to hit more areas than making a pitch every time. If I am a distance away from the target I would like to hit, I will use a pitching presentation to get my bait into the target zone.
If you are fishing in clear water conditions and feel that the bass are line weary, spool up your flipping reel with Sunline Flipping FC in the 20-25lb range. This will allow you to make your presentation a little more undetected many times paying dividends by the end of your day of fishing.
Pay special attention and let the bass tell you how they want the bait fished. There will be days that when the bait hits the water they are on it. This may be days after a cold night followed by a bright sunny day, as the sun warms up the upper layer of the weeds the bass will move to the upper layer of the weeds to soak up the warmth of the sun in the morning. As the day goes on they may move back towards the bottom and take up a new ambush position.
If the bass are positioned on the bottom they may want the bait hoped a couple of times on the bottom to trigger the bite, when you get a bite make a mental note as to where the bite is coming from and how you are fishing the bait. Use this information to key in on and get more bites during your day of fishing. Let the bass tell you how they want the bait presented that day and the key to these holding locations.
So the next time you hit the water this Fall be ready to go toe-to-toe with the bass in your local waters. Be it a jig or just plastics rigged on a heavy cover hook Big Bite has a bait option for you. To see all the Big Bite Baits please log onto www.bigbitebaits.com.

BIG BITE PRO UPDATE

 

 

 

 

 

Photo’s Courtesy Of  BASS.

ROJAS AND LANE MAKE 2016 CLASSIC

Congratulations to Dean Rojas and Russ Lane for making it to the 2016 Bassmaster Classic that will be held on Oklahoma’s Grand Lake March 4-6, 2016. Dean and Russ earned points through the Elite tournaments last year earning spots in the Angler Of The Year race to qualify for the 2016 Classic.

NOVEMBER BIG BITE DEALS

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Posted on

2016 Newsletter #3

PRESS RELEASE
Aug 31, 2014

For Immediate
ReleaseContact:
Scott Petersen
Big Bite Baits

BIG BITE AUGUST NEWS LETTER 

Toe To Toe Bass Action

By: Scott M. Petersen

If you have fished bass long enough you will know to get your fish on certain days you may have to slow down, grab a flipping stick and just go to work. This move may be related to a few different factors. One factor may be fishing pressure, another may be the weather conditions, and last may be just the makeup of the lake or the water source you are fishing. Bass will do one of two things when faced with a lot of fishing pressure, or cold front conditions; one is head towards deeper water or in many cases they will head towards cover most of time thick cover making flipping the best way to go in and get them.

 

In this Big Bite News Letter we are going to talk flipping and pitching tactics. So sit back grab your favorite Big Bite flipping bait and let’s get to work.

 

How you get to the bass will play an important part of how many you will get into the boat. If you let them know you are coming before you even get there I can guarantee you will not catch many bass that day, but if you think before you act you will put allot more odds in your favor.

 

When approaching the cover fish the outside edge of that cover first looking for active bass that are working the edge looking for food. I many times will start working the outside edge of this cover with a BB Kicker rigged on a jig head to start my day. If the bass are active and feeding on top do not be afraid to throw a Spro Bronzeye Popper into the mix.

 

Once it is time to head into the cover I will pull my trolling motor up and start to use a push poll to get me around in the heavy cover. On windy days I will play the wind to my advantage and let it push me through the cover. If I am moving too fast I will use my Minn Kota Talons to hold me in place so I can work the area before moving on. This is the same if I hook a fish or two, I will lock down with my Talons and work the whole area before I move onto the next area.

 

If you elect to use your trolling motor you will many times let the bass know you are in the area the minute that your trolling motor prop hits that first lilly pad stem that something is coming. More times than not as you are going in one side of the cover they are dumping out the other side. So when you have to head into the cover take the steps to be stealth in your fishing and presentation.

 

If you are flipping or pitching to cover like docks or reeds edges, use your trolling motor to position your boat away from these forms of cover. Making long pitches will be the best way to present your bait in these conditions.

 

Equipment

Today when it comes to picking a flipping stick you have a few different choices. In the past flipping sticks were 7’6″ as a primary choice but in today’s environment many fishermen are choosing flipping sticks lengths that are in the 7’10” to 8ft range.  The added few inches help the angler set the hook faster when needed and give you a better feel of what your bait is doing. Reel speed is important when it comes to flipping and pitching, use reels with a speed of 6:3-1 or 7:3-1. The faster the reel speed, the faster you can get the bass out of the cover and coming your way, this also will translate into picking up your line faster and getting a better hook set.

 

Line choice is one of the most critical options that you have to pick when it comes to flipping. Hands down if fishing in heavy cover or dirty water braided line should be your line of choice. My braided line choice is Sunline FX2 in 60 to 80lb. For the conditions that I fish 60lb is my line of choice.

 

If you are fishing around cover in clear water conditions you will be better suited to pick a fluorocarbon line choice. My fluorocarbon line choice is Sunline’s new flipping line called Flipping FC. Match the line size to the conditions you are fishing when it comes to fluorocarbon 20lb to 25lb will do the job in most cases.

 

Weights and hooks play an important part of flipping and picking the right combination of weights and hooks is vital to your success. Almost hands down you will want to peg your weight or use a screw lock weight option to keep the weight in place and next to the plastics you are fishing. I use a rubber bobber stop or a screw lock weight to get this accomplished. If you do not peg your weight the weight will have a tendency to separate from the plastics. An example of this would be if you were flipping into matted cover and using an unpegged weight, the weight could fall through the mat leaving the plastics up on top of the mat. When the weight is pegged that cannot happen the two will always stay together.

 

In the last few years there has been a big push to use straight shanked flipping hooks with plastics keepers. These type hooks at this time are the best of flipping option to use. Tie the hook on with a snell knot, this will cause the hook point (if tied facing in the right direction) to go up and into the top of the bass month every time giving you a solid hook set every time.

 

The best way to tell if your flipping hook is tied on right, hold on to your weight and slowly pull on the line if your flipping hook is tied right the hook point will come up point up and into the top of the bass mouth. If it goes the wrong way cut off and retie the hook the opposite way. Gamakatsu Heavy Cover hook is my hook of choice for flipping. When it comes to size I match the hook size to the size plastic I am using, 4/0 and 5/0 are the most common two sizes that I use.

 

Flipping Tactics

Now that we have laid the ground work with boat positioning and equipment let’s get down to the nuts and bolts of flipping. When you look at the Big Bite line up there are many baits that you can use but I am going to use 6 baits as examples for this News Letter. I am breaking these baits into two groups, dirty water and clear water bait options.

Dirty Water

When fishing in dirty water conditions I will opt to use Big Bites Brush Hog, Kriet Creature and Craw Tube as my baits of choice. One of the biggest reasons for this choice is these baits come with extra appendages which give off more vibration when fished. This will help the bass track down the bait in cover or in dirty water conditions. Remember if the bass cannot find the bait they cannot bite it.

 

Adjust your weight to the conditions that you are fishing. I will generally start with a 3/8oz to 1/2oz sinker. There are two things that you have to consider when picking your weight, there will be days that the bass will want the bait on a slow drop, then there will be days when they will want the bait on a fast drop. It will be up to you to determine what they want that day of fishing.

 

When fishing in matted weeds or in heavy cover you will have to up your weight just to get the bait down through the matted cover to get below. Once again this may be an adjustment from 3/4oz to 1oz. 3/4oz will get through the mat and will have a slower fall than a 1oz weight. At times if the cover is thick or the water is dirty I will look at adding a rattle to the mix to help the bass find the bait.

Clear Water

For clear water situations there are a few things that I will do different. One, I will not always peg my weight. If I am fishing edges of reeds or maybe docks I may leave my weight un-pegged.

When fishing in clear water conditions I will go to a pitching presentation more to stay back from the cover that I am fishing. I feel I spook less bass this way instead of getting on top of the bass like I would if I was fishing in heavy cover.

 

My Big Bite Bait choices for clear water conditions are YoMama, Rojas Fighting Frog, and a Tube. These three baits give me a great base of baits to use during clear water conditions. Yes if I feel I need a little more movement out of my bait I can pull from the other group, but coming out of the gate these are my first choices. When flipping and pitching in clear water conditions do not be afraid to mix it up a little the bass will get a better look at the bait then they will in heavy cover or dirty water conditions.

 

So you have a start to get your flipping tactic at hand. I have just named a few different Big Bite Baits that I use for flipping and pitching presentation in different cover and water conditions. You can use these recommendations or you can mix it up a little and do some experimenting yourself, you make the call. As you will soon find out flipping is a reliable way to catch bass when the bite gets super tough or you have to go in and get them due to the cover you are fishing.  To see all the Big Bite Baits flipping and pitching options please log onto www.bigbitebaits.com